3 May 1921

3 May 1921

Hotel Beau Site, Clarens-Montreux, Switzerland

Bogey: But Wig — this is all jolly fine but why dont you tell me things. Get down to it!
I’m sorry, my precious. Ill have another try. You got my telegram. The journey was excellent. The lits salons were horrid - when they unfolded they were covered thickly with buttons so that one felt like a very sensitive bun having its currants put in. But it was soon morning & my mountains appeared as of yore with snow, like silver light on their tops, and beautiful clouds above, rolling solid white masses. We passed little watery villages clinging to the banks of rivers, it was raining, the trees dripped, and everybody carried a gleaming umbrella. Even the fishers fished under umbrellas, their line looked like the huge feeler of a large water beetle. And then the rain stopped, the cows began to fatten, the houses had broad eaves, the women at the bookstalls got broader & broader & it was Switzerland. I sat on a neat green velvet chair in Geneva for 3 hours. L.M. brought tea on a tray – do you see her, coming from afar, holding the tray high, her head bent, a kind of reverent beam on her face, & the smoke of the teapot mounting like the smoke of sacrifiges? Then we mounted an omnibus train & bummelted round the lake. The carriage was full of germans; I was imbedded in huge ones. When they saw a lilac bush, Vater und die Mamma and even little Hansl all cried Schön. It was very old world. Also they each & all read aloud the notice in the carriage that a cabinet was provided for the convenience of the passengers! (What other earthly reason would it have been there for?)

[To John Middleton Murry in Collected Letters, 7 May.]